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Church Notre Dame de la Tronchaye

Historic site and monument, Listed or registered (CNMHS), Church in Rochefort-en-Terre
  • Timeless, majestic, mysterious, there are plenty of adjectives to describe the church of Rochefort-en-Terre. It is an essential place during a visit to the city.

  • Listed as a Historic Monument, this 12th and 16th century building has a Flamboyant Gothic style facade and a Romanesque bell tower. Visitor map of the village available free of charge at the reception of the Tourist Office and downloadable online The outlying location of the Collegiate Church is atypical. Indeed, the popular tradition tells that in the 10th century, at the time of the Norman invasions (Vikings), a priest hid, in a hollow tree trunk, a wooden statue representing the Virgin...
    Listed as a Historic Monument, this 12th and 16th century building has a Flamboyant Gothic style facade and a Romanesque bell tower. Visitor map of the village available free of charge at the reception of the Tourist Office and downloadable online The outlying location of the Collegiate Church is atypical. Indeed, the popular tradition tells that in the 10th century, at the time of the Norman invasions (Vikings), a priest hid, in a hollow tree trunk, a wooden statue representing the Virgin and her child in order to save it from looting. . Two centuries later, a shepherdess would have found this statue in this same trunk; a church was then built there, on the very spot where the statue was found. This story even gave it its name, “Notre-Dame de la Tronchaye”. Indeed, the term "Tronchaye" would come from the word "trunk". Outside: This beautiful building, made of granite and schist, stands with its square tower not far from the only 2 preserved gates of the city (Porte Cadre and Porte de l'Etang). Over time, it will undergo many changes: - The north facade is completely rebuilt in flamboyant Gothic in 1533. - A Calvary cross offered by Claude I at the beginning of the 16th century is also erected in the middle of the cemetery. - In the 17th century the vessel was provided with an additional nave to the south. - Other works were carried out in the 19th century, but it was not until 1924 that the interior of the church took on its present appearance. Inside: On entering, we notice the inclination of the columns. This phenomenon is due to the fact that the Collegiate Church was built without foundations, directly on the rock: schist. Through this lack of foundation, the Collegiate had begun to follow the movement of the ground; she was sliding south! To stop this movement, the construction of the southern aisle was carried out: this construction serves as a buttress. Following this construction, the collegiate actually stopped sliding, but it began to pivot towards the West! Again it was necessary to add a buttress to the west of the monument. These movements, and the modifications that followed, were made over the centuries, and therefore architectural styles. The Collegiate is a mixture of Romanesque (bell tower), Gothic (North facade) and Renaissance styles. To the right of the choir is a magnificent stained glass window, commissioned in 1927 from a glassmaker from Angers: Mr Roger Desjardin. This stained glass tells the legend of the shepherdess finding the statue in the hollow tree trunk. Calvary: It was nicknamed the Bible of the poor. The sculptures, carved in granite, were used by priests to teach the Bible to the illiterate. This Calvary would be the only one in Brittany to represent the Passion and Ascension of Christ. Open all year round from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Spoken languages
    • French
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